Silent Hills (P.T.) Cancelled by Konami: Digital Art Preservation

In case you haven’t heard, Silent Hills has officially been cancelled by Konami. And while that in itself is a bloody shame, the once legendary game developer seems to be hellbent on extirpating any trace of Hideo Kojima and Guillermo Del Toro’s contribution to the Silent Hill series — even going as far as removing the game’s elaborate teaser (P.T.) from the Playstation Network.

There are some valid reason’s behind Konami’s decission, though. The company seems to have completely lost interest in developing ‘traditional’ games, with Konami’s current president Hideki Hayakawa announcing that they will be focusing primarily on mobile games from now on. As such, there really is no benefit in Konami investing any more time or money into what’s essentially a glorified demo for a game that — from the looks of it — will never see the light of day.

However, as Timothy Torres argues in this PC Magazine article: “By wiping P.T., an elaborate ad for Silent Hills, from the Web, Konami has digitally murdered a work of art.” A sentiment that we here at Cheshire Cat Studios wholeheartedly share.

LaughingMan, CineMax, and Katie discuss Hideo Kojima’s falling-out with Konami, as well as the latter’s decision to focus on what they perceive to be more profitable enterprises such as mobile games and even health spas. Additionally, the trio dissect gaming’s current “preservation crisis” (as PC Magazine puts it) and the sudden inflow of legendary game developers resorting to crowd-funding platforms like Kickstarter in order to bring their creative visions to fruition (see “Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night” by Koji Igarashi and Yooka-Laylee” by Playtonic Games.)

Finally, the three hosts then touch upon Allison Road — a promising new indie horror game title that could be seen as a “spiritual successor” of sorts to Silent Hills. Even though we may never get to play Hideo Kojima and Guillermo Del Toro’s cancelled brainchild, it seems like it has left its mark in gaming by (hopefully) inspiring a new generation of cerebral horror titles to replace the current onslaught of cheap, disposable jump-scare simulators.

Sources:

“Demise of Silent Hills Proves Gaming Has a Preservation Crisis” – PC Magazine

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2484050,00.asp

“Video Games, Modding, and the Law” – Electronic Frontier Foundation

https://www.eff.org/event/video-games-modding-and-law

“Allison Road – Prototype Gameplay” – Steam Greenlight

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=453962371

CineMax

A subversive excommunicated from [REDACTED] as a result of a failed coup d'etat, CineMax has miraculously managed to reach and find asylum in the Land of the Free. Here he spends his days working for Cheshire Cat Studios, all the while plotting his inevitable return to the motherland to once again foment the flames of revolution.

Katie_B

Katie B is a professional Flash animator from Minneapolis, Minnesota. She loves Stoicism, birds, and convincing people that the only good Silent Hill games are 1-4.

LaughingMan

The loveable lunatic with the foul mouth and the iconic laugh, Laughingman is the founder of CCS. With more coffee than copper in his bloodstream, he's a full-time website developer by day, and a gamer, editor, and fiction writer by night.

One Comment on “Silent Hills (P.T.) Cancelled by Konami: Digital Art Preservation

  1. Musicians have figured it out, writers have figured it out, and now game developers are getting the hint.

    In order to have full creative control, you have to be independent. Of course, there are those rare exceptions. But after hearing numerous stories of creators getting ripped off by big media companies/publishers, I think the indie scene is the best for me in my writing/game dev endeavors. The indie scene is the last frontier for artistic integrity.

    It’s sad that Silent Hill might be dead and gone but its legacy will live on in the memories of fans and creators inspired by it, such as myself. I could only aspire make a game with the same gravitas. I still have a lot to learn still so we will see…

    Fear is an instinctual emotion shared amongst all animals. It shocks you initially but it wains over time to impotence. Horror is a different breed. I think true horror comes from human comprehension (or lack of comprehension) of the terrible vile creatures and acts encountered. It’s slow and painful, like barbed wire imbedding itself into vulnerable flesh. And once it sinks its claws into you, it doesn’t let go. It lingers like the revenant of a primal trauma; forever lurking in the corners of you mind.

    Well, that’s how I see it…

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