Remakes/Reboots, the ghosts of the cinema world.

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by KahunaDrake KahunaDrake 7 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #7208
    V-Tundra
    V-Tundra
    Participant

    It’s highly likely that everyone is up to here with soulless remakes and reboots being launched by Hollywood. Visionless and empty cash grabs made purely to catch on the audience’s nostalgia factor; but there was once a time (and rarely today) when remakes and reboots were made with effort, to capture another person’s artistic perspective of a great story, and there are some good remakes out there; re-tellings made with a soul (hence the name ghosts of the cinema world). So, I’ve decided to compile a short list of films many people consider to be actually very good movies that are remakes/reboots.

    Kicking off first, King Kong. The first one was a masterpiece and though the ’76 film wasn’t as great; the 2005 Jackson film remains my favorite “kaiju” film. I absolutely loved the recreated atmosphere of the 30’s, the creatures and monsters from Skull Island, the endless references to the old films and the big man (or ape) himself, Kong was absolutely astounding. I personally think that 2005’s King Kong remains one of the best remakes/reboots out there.

    Speaking of monkeys, Planet of the Apes! One of my favorite sci-fi franchises and the 2 recent films were incredible. The amount of details put into the animalistic acting of the apes and the wrapping lore of the new POTA films make up for something that while new, somehow captures the essence of the original. I’m certainly excited for the upcoming third film.

    And now we delve into deep space: Star Trek. I can’t speak for this one myself since I’m not much of a trekkie, but my uncle’s family can. These guys are the biggest Star Trek fans I know of, their house is just filled with posters, action figures, merchandise, model ships and anything you can think off (including a pinball machine). They completely love the new films as well as many trekkies out there and these films got me into the lore. This is what a reboot should do, introduce the old universe to a completely new generation; and they’ve done it.

    Let’s talk about horror: Hammer films. You’ve got the old Universal monsters updated and IN COLOR. Though they’ve missed a few, some of these films feel fresh and terrifying. If we’re talking about good remakes, we can’t left these unspoken. And if we’re talking about horror, let’s not forget John Carpenter’s “The Thing” and Cronenberg’s “The Fly”.

    So there’s a few I can mention, and I’m sure I may have skipped a few others, but here’s to show that remakes can be something good, if some actual effort is put into it. Do you guys know of any other remakes/reboots that are actually good?

    "The universe is one big joke, and the joke is on us"

    #7209
    Jake_L
    Jake_L
    Participant

    Hmmm. I enjoyed the Total Recall remake; obviously the 1990 Paul Verhoven/Arnold Schwarzenegger action flick remains one of my most favorite movies of all time, the remake plays closer to the Phillip K Dick’s themes of identity and crisis of reality in a way that is (literally) more down to Earth. Sure there isn’t the plot twist that Hauser was bad all along, and Collin Farrel is more of a character study than an unstoppable juggernaut, and the ending chase scene was a dud, I enjoyed it on more or less the same level as the 1990 Verhoven film.

    The Captain America movies today are so much better than the 1979 and 1990 flicks it’s beyond mentioning—even for fans of 80s schlock like me. ’83’s Scarface outdoes the original 1932 Prohibition story by leaps and bounds, underplaying the incestuous sibling romance undertones and turning Antonio Montana into a drug addicted crime lord with something approaching a moral standard, versus a low-rung rum runner who’s shit to death after he TRIPS coming down the stairs after he’s arrested. 2012’s DREDD (3D) simultaneously deconstructs, analyses, and reconstructs the character of Joeseph Dredd while keeping a few elements of the 1995 Stallone flick and keeping with the usually twisted and zanny humor from the off-the-wall British comedic parody 2000 AD comic (something we Americans didn’t catch).

    Probably the most out standing remake I’ve seen in recent memory was Robocop, another Pul Verhoven feature; also the most LITERAL definition of a conflict of interests. The original Paul Verhoven movie was more of a parody of sci-fi and action trends of the ’80s, mostly the ‘cowboy cop’ archetype, but a lampooning deconstruction of the 6 Million Dollar Man, corporate greed vs doctrine, and materialism tying into the value of your life’s worth, et al.

    The 2014 remake was more of a character study and an examination of Robocop as a cog in the American industrial complex and posses some very controversial questions: is the use of unmanned aerial combat drones ethical in the field of war? Should they be used on U.S. soil? Is human judgement more valuable than computerized logic? I won’t say it’s without flaws—cuz hoo-BOY does it have issues—but it was entertaining.

    #7212
    Mr.K
    Mr.K
    Participant

    If I’m gonna pick a remake that outdoes the original, it goes to The Crazies:

    Take one of George A. Romero’s most boring pieces of shit films and remake it into something so much better than it has every right to be. I love the atmosphere of paranoia and panic within the small town with the characters trying to deal with some sort of epidemic that makes people go batshit insane while killing each other really makes my blood pump up everytime something terrifying happens on screen. I also like the characters and while there are a few hiccups, you do feel for the characters as they fight together and you want them to succeed in living another day (unlike that Day of the Deay remake that was filled with pretentious assholes who need a good shotgun blast in the face) and I like the film exploring the theme of consequences of creating weapons for global warfare and how can one accident can cause a town, society or city to become a rampaging hellhole (it’s not anything new but I like the way it was handled in this film with the use of subtlety, which is the best thing you can use to express a story or themes you want to convey to your audience). Overall, really badass remake.

    "The world is merciless and it's also very beautiful."

    #7214
    KahunaDrake
    KahunaDrake
    Participant

    You guys stole the answers from my mouths.

    King Kong (2005), The Crazies, and the Total Recall-remake were great. Total Recall stands out to me because the sets in the original were so bad and stunk of retro-futurism that kind of took me out of the story b/c I was critiquing the sets. While the mutants were taken out, I thought it was cool that they had the chick with the 3 tits still there as a callback. The updates sets/CGI effects enhanced the futuristic angle of the setting (those LED dragon tattoos were sweet!).

    I would like to put Disturbia as another remake that’s decent. It’s a modern retelling of probably my favorite Alfred Hitchcock movie “Rear Window”. Instead of a wheelchair-bound apartment tenant, it’s a troubled teen on house arrest. It was a thriller and you know the neighbor was doing twisted shit but how would the kids warn people and prevent him from killing.

    The Fright Night remake was fun too (RIP Anton Yelchin) even if I prefer the original more.

    I think the formula to success with these types of remakes is that they have to be respectful to the original but put a fresh spin on it that doesn’t detract what made the original great (story, characters, etc.). The problem is that some studios choose these projects for a quick cash-grab on people’s nostalgia but they don’t take the effort necessary to make it viable.

    I’m kind of surprised they haven’t tried to remake The ‘Burbs or Big Trouble in Little China yet. Maybe I should keep my mouth shut.

    Rabid ecstasy, 1997

    #7440
    Mr.K
    Mr.K
    Participant

    I’m kind of surprised they haven’t tried to remake The ‘Burbs or Big Trouble in Little China yet. Maybe I should keep my mouth shut.

    John Carpenter is rebooting Big Trouble in Little China from what I have read. It has been going on for quite sometime way back in 2006 if I remember when it was first announced.

    "The world is merciless and it's also very beautiful."

    #7443
    KahunaDrake
    KahunaDrake
    Participant

    John Carpenter is rebooting Big Trouble in Little China from what I have read. It has been going on for quite sometime way back in 2006 if I remember when it was first announced.

    Hmm don’t remember hearing that but at least its lead by someone who directed the original (like Twin Peaks season 3) so hopefully it won’t be too out there.

    I guess LaughingMan was right about Carpenter not minding remakes: “Every time they do one, a royalty check magically materializes in my hand.”

    Rabid ecstasy, 1997

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