Mexico: Green for drugs, white for lies and red for spilled blood.

Home Forums Off Topic Mexico: Green for drugs, white for lies and red for spilled blood.

This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by KahunaDrake KahunaDrake 7 months ago.

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  • #6966
    V-Tundra
    V-Tundra
    Participant

    I’m not really the kind of man who goes on social networks and asks people to share X video for Y cause, but since lately we’ve been talking about freedom of speech and censoring on the forums; I thought I’d might share with you a real problem that is going on.

    https://www.facebook.com/itmatters.news/videos/1759565647632509/

    Now, let me be clear: the video is horribly biased. The Mexican government wants to implant an educational reform that at its core, wants to privatize education; which means families will have to spend a lot of money for their children to go to school, and that’s IF they can even afford it. There are already many private schools around Mexico, but only a small percentage of children attend them, and many people who send their children to public schools which greatly outnumber private schools; don’t have a lot of money to spend on materials and fees. Hence why a proposition passed a couple of years ago to give children free school materials, but it’s not looking so good because of the E.R.

    The fact that the video got right was people dying at the hands of the protests. These people are being quelled out through force and brutality instead of being engaged in open and fair debate, but the government itself has been censoring the media to make it look as if the main reason for the protests was because of an evaluation and that would make the teachers look like a bunch of lazy slobs. And there’s also the fact that many of the protesters aren’t teachers, but people who can’t afford a lot of money on the education of their children. But of course, the government has been censoring all information that comes out and hence, the deaths of people won’t get to world media (I know I sound like one of those meth heads who say “ITS A CONSPIRACY MAAAAAAAAAN, THE GOVERNMENT WANTS TO WASH OUR BRAINS TO HERD THE SHEEP MAAAAAAN”, but here in Mexico, it’s all a reality.

    The political party who is currently in power, the Partido Revolucionario Institucional or PRI, has been committing all sorts of acts which have been known to the populace for years: control over the news on the mexican media, various arrangements with cartel leaders and members, extortion and fraud at elections, collaboration with criminals vía bribes and now this.

    The most famous incident caused by this group was the massacre of ’68 or the Tlatelolco Massacre and the Dirty War (during the Cold War), when the government committed kidnappings, extortions, torture and possible executions against left-wing student and guerrilla groups. The most famous of these is the massacre of ’68: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlatelolco_massacre#Massacre

    The government had been committing a lot of uncalled, unauthorized and extreme actions against several schools, including the UNAM and IPN which are the 2 biggest colleges in Mexico. These actions include the occupations and assaults on campuses. Because of this, on October 2nd of 1968, many student groups rounded up at the Tlatelolco square to protest against the government’s fierce actions. These protests would cause trouble because the Olympics were going to be held on México later on 1968, so the president at-the-time, Gustavo Días Ordaz (a PRI candidate), sent tanks, helicopters and soldiers to the square. At 5:55 PM, red flares were shot at the sky which signaled the beginning of the attack. The military began to kill all protesters in sight, including some civilians. 30-300 people died that day. One of my grandaunts lived on the nearby apartments at the day of the massacre with her family, so I got a small interview from her. She quotes:

    “We heard nothing but screams and shots, and the air took on a reddish fog. After the shooting was over, it was nothing but silence and orders from generals. They scouted out the nearby buildings to hunt down people who were hiding. Our neighbor was hiding two boys, one who was fatally shot on his arm. I could hear them weep and whisper “They’re coming”. Two men broke into her apartment, searched the place and a few moments later we heard gunshots. They took her down the stairs. We could hear her desperate cries for help resonating the complex. We never saw her again. At the end of the day, the air stenched of a foul, metallic odor. The square was abandoned, accompanied only by a few soldiers and janitors who were scrubbing the blood of the streets.”

    The morning after the massacre, the plaza was to be washed away because of all the stained blood on the pavement. The massacre is one of the most condemning acts the PRI has committed, and it’s the one that has stained their reputation even more. Many claim that the protesters started attacking the military, but documents made public in 2002 show that there were snipers positioned before the attack, sent by the government itself. The day after the massacre, the mainstream media attempted to give as little attention as possible to the massacre, focusing on more petty news to cover it up. That didn’t work.

    So, I guess that the point of this article is that for those who say that government control and media manipulation isn’t something feasible, Mexico is the prime example that it can be. It’s a dictatorship, where the sheep are happy to be leaded by the shepherd. Forget the staining of morality, the manipulation and coverup of events, forget that the ones we put our trust on are the same people who allow criminals to publicly hang civilians on bridges; yeah, forget all of that when the government gives you a petty 50 dollar coupon for a store in exchange for your loyalty.

    “¿Pero cómo se supone que le dé la espalda a mi tricolor? (But how am I supposed to turn my back on my tricolor?)”

    If you guys are more interested on the actions of the PRI, I’d suggest you take a look at the movies from Bandido Films: though they involve fictional scenarios, they are heavily based on real-life events. Here’s a list of their best works:

    La Ley de Herodes/Herod’s Law: Satirizes the corruption of the PRI in the aftermath of the revolution. (Which is the time where the PRI rose to power)

    Un Mundo Maravilloso/A Wonderful World: Satirizes the socioeconomic and political states of the Mexican people, and how the government has been trying to show that there’s far less poverty than there actually is.

    El Infierno/Hell: This one isn’t a satire. This one is an actual, 100% accurate depiction of the situation on the north with the cartels and the government’s collaboration with them. Fair warning, you’ll need a strong stomach to watch this one; because this one is the real deal. It’s like if you were watching what’s actually happening.

    La Dictadura Perfecta/The Perfect Dictatorship: This one satirizes the government’s grip on the media, and how it twists and shapes the news for the people to be deceived. This one, like Hell is also a very accurate representation of the situation going on in Mexico, as most of its pivotal moments are heavily based on real-life events.

    "The universe is one big joke, and the joke is on us"

    #6968
    KahunaDrake
    KahunaDrake
    Participant

    How do you guys deal with all of the corruption/censorship from the government on top off all of the cartel violence? It sounds insane.

    People up here seemed concerned with the drug violence spilling over. Where I used to live in Ohio, the cartels are importing heroin like crazy and there was a family of 8 in a nearby county that was killed execution style. I don’t think they have found the perpetrators but by the organized nature of the slaying (and the fact they had pot growing on their property), the Sinaloa are suspected because of their activities in the area.

    Makes me wonder if legalization will help anything.

    I hope the corruption is rooted out and people see the truth. These types of governments aren’t good for anyone.

    Stay safe, Tundra. Peace

    Rabid ecstasy, 1997

    #6970
    V-Tundra
    V-Tundra
    Participant

    Oh, like always; we adapt. It’s a funny thing for the Mexican people, the stereotype of being lazy comes very close. If we get fucked, we take it and stay there. If there’s change, we join it and move. If the change stops, we stop. Like I said, being lazy is something very close to us. The pitch-perfect example is the Mexican revolution: we started it to overthrow a dictator (Porfirio Díaz) and it all came down to us being lead by another dictator (or a party of dictators).

    About legalization, I think that at the long run it could help. In my opinion, this situation with drugs is very similar to that of the prohibition. If we legalize drugs, the groups that are benefiting from it will move onto other businesses, and slowly lose their power. In the end, they’ll be focused on a business that will bring no harm to anyone. Will there be retaliation? Certainly, the cartels are too powerful and they will fight for their business; but with a bit of hope, it won’t be too big.

    Thanks for the words, Kahuna. Hopefully, things may change now that people are being more aware of their surroundings. But then again, people will change their loyalty for an umbrella and a doll of the president.

    "The universe is one big joke, and the joke is on us"

    #6973
    KahunaDrake
    KahunaDrake
    Participant

    About legalization, I think that at the long run it could help. In my opinion, this situation with drugs is very similar to that of the prohibition. If we legalize drugs, the groups that are benefiting from it will move onto other businesses, and slowly lose their power. In the end, they’ll be focused on a business that will bring no harm to anyone. Will there be retaliation? Certainly, the cartels are too powerful and they will fight for their business; but with a bit of hope, it won’t be too big.

    That’s what I think. Seeing documentaries on budding (lol) marijuana businesses, it seems that legalized venues are a nicer, less shady alternative. Plus, they make a wide-range of products from pot. The only problems I see so far is a grey market (people buying legal pot from Colorado/Washington state and selling it in other states), market instability (still illegal in other areas and you can’t put your money in a bank), and possible cartel retaliation.

    Still, the cartels can push “harder” drugs like meth, heroin, and cocaine and continue with their human trafficking business.

    Rabid ecstasy, 1997

    #6976
    V-Tundra
    V-Tundra
    Participant

    Still, the cartels can push “harder” drugs like meth, heroin, and cocaine and continue with their human trafficking business.

    And we’ve got to thank almost 30 years of inactivity and government idling for it. Not only Mexican, but countries which have collaborated with drug trafficking (Colombia and Peru). As for harder drugs, I think they should be legalized; because I don’t see any difference between drugs, alcohol or smokes. They’ll harm your body eventually, but the people have the right to use them if they wish. Sure, I acknowledge my liver can’t handle too much, but I do enjoy a scotch on a late friday night with friends. But “think of the children!!”. Smoking pot makes people terrorists! Vodka killed my dog! Smokes were invented by Hitler!

    And I do think that the grey market also poses an even bigger, because that’s how most cartels were and some are still growing big: buy marijuana from Holland and sell it on Honduras for 3x the original price. And cartel retaliation could be the worse scenario. Even if it’s temporary, with all the resources the cartels have, it would last a long time; but I do think it would be worth it. For the right of purchase and the right to use drugs.

    "The universe is one big joke, and the joke is on us"

    #6980
    KahunaDrake
    KahunaDrake
    Participant

    As for harder drugs, I think they should be legalized; because I don’t see any difference between drugs, alcohol or smokes.

    True. I think most people are scared that if pot is legalized, people will push for meth legalization. This is despite the fact that marijuana is consumed more and, for the most part, people who are pro-pot don’t like the effects of “hard” drugs. They might go for LSD, shrooms, and X though IDK.

    Eh, I’m neither for or against drugs but if it helps reduce the violence and collateral damage associated with the drug trade then I’m for it as a possible solution. Unfortunately, only time will tell and we won’t know unless we try (I guess that is why we got Colorado for).

    Rabid ecstasy, 1997

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